Scale and Space

I’m going to stop marvelling at how much time has passed since the last time I posted updates about my professional life, as it’s clearly been unforgivably way-too-long! A gentle reminder that my research blog, The Other Sociologist, has more regular posts about my research outside my paid work. My updates here are more about my public sociology.  Nevertheless, I’m eternally sorry that I update here far less frequently than I hope to.

Since we last caught up in February, I wrote about my time living and working in the Central Coast, I talked about why White people shouldn’t tag people of colour in their social media posts about race, how to use intersectionality in collective responses to sexual harassment in higher education, I showed international examples of how White people compare racism ineffectively across societies, and much more. I’ve also reflected on a large project that’s occupied my free time, which was to consolidate my various social media and microblogging into one spot, my research blog. I discussed that blogging carries a huge emotional tax, via public harassment, and why I persevere in spite of this abuse. Continue reading Scale and Space

Feminist Sociology and the Mundane

Writing at the top of graphi says 'Talking feminist sociology.' Image below is the header used by Lady Science. It is a drawing of several women dressed in STEM occupational outfits such as nurses and scientists

 

Happy lunar new year and happy 2019! The end of last year flew by in a whirl. October 2018 was busy as I geared up to leave on a six-week secondment. I worked with Barang Regional Alliance on their Youth Summit and Three-Year Youth Plan. Barang is the backbone for Aboriginal-controlled organisations in the Central Coast of New South Wales. I lived in the Central Coast from the end of October to early December. You can see some of my adventures on my Instagram and hopefully more soon on my research blog.

After some lovely rest and interstate travel, it’s been back to work on scaling up our vocational education trials and scoping other exciting new projects.

In January 2019, Lady Science published a podcast about my career and feminism. I talk about what sociology is and how Indigenous and other minority sociologists continue to challenge Western and colonial methods and ideas in sociology and in social policy. I also discuss the concept of ‘otherness,’ which unpacks how ideas of difference position dominant and less powerful groups. Take a listen to see how we can improve societies by being more aware of power and fighting institutional inequality.

A new textbook on Social Deviance lists my research blog as a resource for the sociology of mundane deviance. This is not quite how I would categorise what Professor Philomena Essed calls ‘everyday racism.’ This is the connections between routine interactions which reproduce racism and institutional discrimination. Still, Professor Henry sees a connection between microaggressions and social deviance.

When the Journal of Mundane Behaviour closed down in 2004, it left a gap in the field, which was filled in 2011 by Zuleyka Zeallos, an applied sociologist of Latin-Australian background, and her blog site: https://othersociologist.com. This site is worth exploring for the everyday, unremarkable practices in which humans engage that are “common, unexciting or ‘humdrum’ and provides a glipse at mundane deviance, with which it often overlaps when observing the irreverent aspects of social life. Yet the site also shows how the mundane practices and a series of “microaggressions” can socially construct consequential stereotypical categories sucha as “race.”

Professor Henry lectures in criminal justice and is Director of the School of Public Affairs, San Diego State University.

You can read other textbooks which reference my work under Citations.

Inclusion from Melbourne to Mars

It’s been too long since I updated my movements here! Here’s a summary of what I’ve been up to in the last few months:

Interview: Sociologist at Work

The following is an excerpt; the second of a two-part interview with me on Mendeley Careers, first published on 17 May 2017. (Find part one here.)

Everyone knows how hard it is to get a tenure track role, but we maintain this illusion that this is the only way we can have a fulfilling job. I advise researchers to look beyond the stigma: once you step off the academic track, there’s a world of opportunities. I’ve done work with government, I’ve led a research team investigating environmental health and safety, I’ve worked with nonprofits. I come to my career with the knowledge that there is a lot of fluidity in what I can do. I may do a lot of consulting for a while, and then go back into working for a traditional research organisation.

Researchers should know: our skills are highly valued outside academia, we need to learn how to market them. We should find a way to show to clients and employers how those research skills can be useful. If you can master that, potential employers and clients will give you amazing opportunities. For example, I once went to a job interview for a role as a researcher, and based solely on the questions I asked, the employers in question offered me a management role on the spot.

A non-academic career role is nothing to be ashamed of; it is a source of pride that strengthens research impact on society, as it brings knowledge to new sectors. There are many, many organisations which are in dire need of scientific skills and expertise; in the process, you can achieve great progress for a variety of communities.

Read more on Mendeley Careers.

Community day out on a sunny day
A non-academic career strengthens research impact

Interracial Dating: Pushing Past Prejudice

White woman and South Asian man dance in a park

 

Last week, I was interviewed on Triple J radio for the program, The Hook Up. The show explored listeners’ experiences of sexual fetishisation and prejudice in relationships, as well as what it’s like being partned with people from minority backgrounds. A few minority background callers described feeling reduced to only one facet of their identity due to sexual racism. An Indigenous woman talked about the explicit and implicit racism she faces as someone perceived not to look and act like a “typical” Aboriginal woman (despite the diversity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people). A woman of Indian background felt no strong cultural connection to India but was often placed in the position of being tokenised because of her heritage.

The discussion featured the talented Zambian-Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker Santilla Chingapie. She reflected on her SBS documentary Date My Race, where she shared her personal experiences being discriminated against as a Black Australian woman on dating apps. White Australian counsellor Sue Pratt talked about the challenging patterns that interracial couples experience as they attempt to work through cultural differences, as well as strategies to manage intercultural respect in relationships. Andy Trieu, Australian-Vietnamese co-host of the SBS TV show, Pop Asia, discussed how the only women who respond to him on dating apps are from similar Asian backgrounds. He expressed a curiosity about dating White women and why they may not be interested in him as an Asian man. Shantan Wantan Ichiban discussed the racist implications of the question “Where are you from?,” which is often used as opening line in bars and other pickup situations.

I discussed how people often try to frame sexual fetishes as a positive compliment, but that this is misguided. Racial fetishes are the twin side of the same coin of racism; on the one side are stereotypes that emphasise exotic otherness and on the other side are those same people who must navigate multiple experiences of being discriminated against as they go about their daily lives. I note that one thing we can collectively do to start tackling sexual racism is to start having broader conversations about race and racism in Australia. Most of the people who have racial fetishes and those who exclude being open to dating particular groups have never had to think about their race. There are many resources available, including on social media, that are produced by minority groups, that help us all to better understand other cultures without fetishising differences and which break down negative biases.

Listen to the discussion below via Triple J.*

Notes

*Update, as the podcast page is now archived and the file can’t be played on Triple J, it is embedded in the player above for your convenience.

Interview: Sociology at Work

Workshop participants reading

The following is an excerpt; the first of a two-part interview with me on Mendeley Careers, first published on 17 May 2017.

Your speciality is the “Sociology of Work” – what are your sociological observations of the research workplace?

My focus is on gender equity and diversity. I have worked with many different organisations as a consultant and project manager; I’ve instructed them on how to review, enhance, and evaluate effectiveness of different policies. I’ve also provided consultancy on how to provide training at different levels so organisations can better understand their obligations and responsibilities.

My work includes enhancing workplace culture, particularly, the everyday cultural dynamics that impact on working life. For example, by offering more flexibility for workers, and looking at where there may be gaps or opportunities to enhance existing procedures. I also study how everyday interactions can enhance productivity. In other words, I don’t just look at how organisations can meet their legislative requirements, which are merely the minimum standard. I also work with teams to see how they interact and how organisations can create policies to suit their unique workplace needs.

In the course of my career, I have worked with a number of research organisations, mainly here in Australia, such as the Academy of Science. I helped them implement their gender and diversity programme. I have also worked with several other national and state research programmes, looking at how they can meet the challenges of intersectionality issues; that is, how they can better understand how gender equity and racism intersect along with other diversity needs, including those associated with class, sexuality, and disability.

I’m sad to say that the research community is far behind other sectors: bullying is much higher in academic and research contexts. Although there ought to be a better understanding of diversity, minorities report they are targeted via a variety of forms, including microaggressions – everyday comments and “jokes” that exclude or demean differences. Furthermore, compared to industry and government, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA) people in the research sector are more likely to remain “in the closet.” Studies indicate people working in universities feel less safe in disclosing their sexual identity to their managers, and they feel more susceptible to harassment and homophobia. This is particularly prevalent in Australia and English speaking countries including the UK and USA.

Read more on Mendeley Careers.

Black woman at work
I recommend that leadership groups incorporate gender equity and diversity as a central organising principle

Media Interviews on March for Science

Protesters at a rally in a park, in Sydney

I have recently given a few media interviews on my analysis of equity, inclusion and accessibility and March for Science. I was interviewed about my articles on the problems with the march and the science of diversity, as well as the anti-diversity discourse by march supporters. Below, I briefly discuss issues emerging from the media interviews I’ve done with STAT News, Buzzfeed, The New York Times, Wired, and Living Lab Radio. Continue reading Media Interviews on March for Science